Forage enhancement

To improve forage quantity and quality for livestock and/or wildlife.

Redtop

Redtop is a long-lived, perennial tufted grass with common names like bentgrass or ticklegrass. Several closely related species of this bentgrass group are discussed in the literature including redtop (Agrostis gigantea Roth or Agrostis stolonifera - introduced), and hair bentgrass (Agrostis scabra - native). The common name ticklegrass can refer to any of these species. Redtop was introduced and has become naturalized throughout British Columbia. It is abundant following disturbance, especially in the northeastern part of British Columbia.

Tall Wheatgrass

Tall wheatgrass is a long-lived, tall, perennial bunchgrass introduced to North America from Russia. It is often used for rehabilitation of saline areas. It has an extensive fibrous root system that can grow 300 cm (118 in.) into the soil. Plants form a “bunch” that increases in size with age.

Stems are coarse and grow 100 to 300 cm tall (39 to 118 in.). Leaves are 2 to 6.5 mm with short hairs that make them scratchy to the touch.

Sainfoin

Sainfoin is a drought tolerant, relatively short-lived, deep-rooted, non-bloating perennial legume. It can be useful in grazing systems because it is non-bloating and maintains good forage quality for late-season grazing or stockpiling. It may have a place in site rehabilitation and reclamation situations as it will grow on high pH, alkaline, thin, or gravelly soils. It is resistant to several diseases that threaten alfalfa productivity.

Intermediate/ Pubescent Wheatgrass

Intermediate wheatgrass is an erect, tall, perennial grass. Pubescent wheatgrass is currently considered to be a type of intermediate wheatgrass, although originally it was considered a separate species.

It appears to be a bunchgrass but some varieties have stronger, longer creeping rhizomes than others. It forms deep, extensive fibrous roots. Stems are 50 to 150 cm (20 to 60 in.) tall. Leaves are blue-green to green and 2 to 10 mm wide with thickened and hardened margins.

Tufted Hairgrass

Tufted hairgrass is a short-lived, tufted, cool season, native perennial bunchgrass. Roots are shallow, fibrous, and dense. A mass of deep green leaves covers the crown. Densely tufted and with numerous stems, this native grass is found throughout British Columbia. Seed production is important for stand maintenance. It is valuable as a range grass and fairly resistant to close grazing.

Crested Wheatgrass

Crested wheatgrass is a hardy, perennial, agronomic bunchgrass with fibrous roots. The Agropyron species (A. cristatum, A. desertorum) occurring in British Columbia hybridize readily when growing together, forming morphologically intermediate plants. Some cultivars are also intermediate, being derived from hybrids.

Creeping Red Fescue

Creeping red fescue is a long-lived, hardy, creeping rooted, cool season perennial grass, important for its use in stabilizing soil, as stockpiled forage, as blending for the turf industry, and as a seed crop in the Peace Region.

Root systems are fibrous with short rhizomes. Roots form a thick sod that is resilient to traffic, but they are less dense than smooth bromegrass or Kentucky bluegrass.

Stems are up to 90 cm (35 in.) tall and are often reclining at the base. Mostly basal leaves are produced and are 5 to15 cm (2 to 6 in.) long.

Common Vetch

Common vetch is a cool season, winter annual legume that is often used as a green manure crop or in pasture mixes. It is sometimes referred to as garden vetch. It has a taproot that can grow 100 to 175 cm (39 to 70 in.) deep, and prolific smaller roots in the upper 15 to 30 cm (6 to 12 in.) of the soil.

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