Thompson - Okanagan

Russian Wildrye

Russian wildrye is a large, cool season, introduced, long-lived, perennial bunchgrass. It is well suited for pasture and stockpiled grazing. The roots are fibrous and may establish to a depth of 1.9 to 2.6 m (6 to 8 ft.). However, about 75% of the roots are in the surface 15 to 60 cm (6 to 24 in.). Russian wildrye roots have an extended horizontal spread and may draw heavily on soil moisture for a distance of up to 1.3 to 1.6 m (4 to 5 ft.).

Meadow Bromegrass

Meadow bromegrass is a hardy, long-lived, high-yielding, cool season perennial grass. It regrows very quickly after grazing, even late in the season. Meadow bromegrass has fibrous roots and short rhizomes which spread slowly.

Dahurian Wildrye

Dahurian wildrye is a short-lived, shallow-rooted perennial bunchgrass native to Siberia, Mongolia, and China. “James” and “Arthur” are two varieties developed and registered for use in Canada.

Rough Fescue

Rough fescue is a densely tufted, native perennial bunchgrass, and an important component of British Columbia’s native grasslands. The name rough refers to the rough edges of the leaves and stems.

It has fibrous roots and is rarely rhizomatous. Plants spread from tufts growing at the edges of the crowns.

Alfalfa

Alfalfa is the most widely used perennial, cool season agronomic legume, and is adapted to many regions and uses. It is palatable for livestock but can cause bloat if not managed carefully.

Idaho Fescue

Idaho fescue is a densely tufted, native perennial bunchgrass. It is an important component of late successional upper grassland plant communities in southern British Columbia, and is common throughout the U.S. Pacific Northwest. The recognition of Idaho fescue as separate species is questioned by some authors, who consider it a variety of Festuca occidentalis (western fescue). However, it is closely related to the Festuca ovina complex and has long been identified as a separate species.

Cicer Milkvetch

Cicer milkvetch is a palatable, non-bloating, perennial legume. The name comes from the belief that goat’s milk supply was increased from eating vetches. It does not accumulate toxic levels of selenium, unlike many of the other milkvetches or “loco weed.”

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