Bulkley - Nechako

Russian Wildrye

Russian wildrye is a large, cool season, introduced, long-lived, perennial bunchgrass. It is well suited for pasture and stockpiled grazing. The roots are fibrous and may establish to a depth of 1.9 to 2.6 m (6 to 8 ft.). However, about 75% of the roots are in the surface 15 to 60 cm (6 to 24 in.). Russian wildrye roots have an extended horizontal spread and may draw heavily on soil moisture for a distance of up to 1.3 to 1.6 m (4 to 5 ft.).

Tall Fescue

Tall fescue is a deep-rooted, medium- to long-lived, perennial bunchgrass. Although it is considered a cool season grass, tall fescue can tolerate more heat than other cool season grasses, and is considered a transition between the two types. Longevity in northern regions is extremely variable and dependent on variety. It is similar to meadow fescue but is distinguished by having wider, less glossy leaves.
 

Hairy Vetch

Hairy vetch is an annual or biennial, hardy, cool season agronomic legume, also commonly referred to as fodder vetch, winter vetch, or sand vetch. It has a weak tap root that grows up to 60 to 90 cm (24 to 35 in.) with many side branches in the top 20 cm (8 in.), and is known as an excellent nitrogen fixer.

Hairy vetch has long trailing stems from 50 to 200 cm (20 to 79 in.) long. Stems are hairy and grow 1 to 3 cm (1/2 to 1 ¼ in.)long leaves on one side of the stem. There are 10 to 20 alternate, oblong leaflets per leaf, with branching tendrils at the ends.

Fowl Bluegrass

Fowl bluegrass is a loosely tufted, low growing, native, cool season, perennial bunchgrass. It is commonly a minor component in native grass seed mixes. It has fibrous roots and a tufted bunchgrass growth habit, but can form a weak sod. It grows 40 to 122 cm (16 to 48 in.) tall. Stems are erect, purplish, and curved at the base. The leaves are greenish, flat or folded, and 1.5 to 3 mm wide with boat or keel-shaped tips. The tiny flowers of fowl bluegrass are produced in mid-spring and are yellow.

Western Wheatgrass

Western wheatgrass is a native cool-season perennial grass that grows from conspicuous white rhizomes, and is strongly rhizomatous. Western wheatgrass is a sub-dominant in plant communities with bluebunch wheatgrass and Idaho fescue, and is dominant on many sites on mixed-grass prairie east of the Rockies. On clay sites it is usually found with green needlegrass (Nassella viridula (Trin.) Barkworth - syn. Stipa viridula).

Redtop

Redtop is a long-lived, perennial tufted grass with common names like bentgrass or ticklegrass. Several closely related species of this bentgrass group are discussed in the literature including redtop (Agrostis gigantea Roth or Agrostis stolonifera - introduced), and hair bentgrass (Agrostis scabra - native). The common name ticklegrass can refer to any of these species. Redtop was introduced and has become naturalized throughout British Columbia. It is abundant following disturbance, especially in the northeastern part of British Columbia.

Intermediate/ Pubescent Wheatgrass

Intermediate wheatgrass is an erect, tall, perennial grass. Pubescent wheatgrass is currently considered to be a type of intermediate wheatgrass, although originally it was considered a separate species.

It appears to be a bunchgrass but some varieties have stronger, longer creeping rhizomes than others. It forms deep, extensive fibrous roots. Stems are 50 to 150 cm (20 to 60 in.) tall. Leaves are blue-green to green and 2 to 10 mm wide with thickened and hardened margins.

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