Invasive plant suppression

To suppress or prevent spread of invasive or weedy plants.

Test as Sandra Mix 8 Dec

Great applications for out of region users. This is just a fictional test of this seeding web tool.

 

Agronomics Bunchgrass Mixture

  1. Altitude: 0 - 2150 metres (7000 ft)
  2. Rainfall: 25.5+ cm (10 + inches)
  3. Seeding Rate: 60-100kg/ha (50 - 100 lbs /acre)
  4. Use where immediate soil protection is required and invasive species are not present, but where it is important that other species, particularly native move in over time.
  5. Optional: The perennial ryegrass can be replaced with fall rye.

Big Bluegrass

Big bluegrass is a native, cool season, long-lived, perennial bunchgrass that matures early in the growing season. It is part of what is referred to as the Sandberg bluegrass complex, which includes 8 species, including big bluegrass, Canby bluegrass, slender bluegrass, Alkali bluegrass, Nevada bluegrass, Sandberg bluegrass, and pine bluegrass. The differentiating characteristics within this complex of species often vary with environmental factors, making distinguishing amongst them very difficult.

Smooth Bromegrass

Smooth bromegrass is a high-yielding, cold hardy, long-lasting, creeping perennial grass. Roots are deep, fibrous, and very fine. Once established it grows creeping rhizomes and can become root bound.

Stems can reach as high as 1.2 m (48 in.) in height. Leaf blades are rolled, hairless, large and wide, up to 1.5 cm (1/2 in.). There is often a “W” constriction in the upper leaf.

Hard Fescue/Sheep Fescue

Hard fescue is an introduced, cool season bunchgrass with fibrous roots. Hard fescue is not native to North America and was introduced from Europe. There is some confusion about the scientific naming of the species, mostly because in older works it was considered a subspecies of sheep fescue (Festuca ovina var. duriscula). Sheep fescue is also introduced from Europe, but is closely related to the red fescue (F. rubra) complex, which is native to North America.

Slender Wheatgrass

Slender wheatgrass is a cool season, native perennial bunchgrass. Its roots are fibrous, sometimes with short rhizomes.

This grass has a wide geographic distribution throughout North America. Like bluebunch wheatgrass, two subspecies occur in British Columbia. The awned version, Elymus trachycaulus ssp. subsecundus (Link) A. Love & D. Love, occurs more frequently in southern British Columbia, while the awnless plant (Elymus trachycaulus (Link) Gould ex Shinners ssp. trachycaulus) is prevalent through most of the province.

Intermediate/ Pubescent Wheatgrass

Intermediate wheatgrass is an erect, tall, perennial grass. Pubescent wheatgrass is currently considered to be a type of intermediate wheatgrass, although originally it was considered a separate species.

It appears to be a bunchgrass but some varieties have stronger, longer creeping rhizomes than others. It forms deep, extensive fibrous roots. Stems are 50 to 150 cm (20 to 60 in.) tall. Leaves are blue-green to green and 2 to 10 mm wide with thickened and hardened margins.

Western Wheatgrass

Western wheatgrass is a native cool-season perennial grass that grows from conspicuous white rhizomes, and is strongly rhizomatous. Western wheatgrass is a sub-dominant in plant communities with bluebunch wheatgrass and Idaho fescue, and is dominant on many sites on mixed-grass prairie east of the Rockies. On clay sites it is usually found with green needlegrass (Nassella viridula (Trin.) Barkworth - syn. Stipa viridula).

Creeping Red Fescue

Creeping red fescue is a long-lived, hardy, creeping rooted, cool season perennial grass, important for its use in stabilizing soil, as stockpiled forage, as blending for the turf industry, and as a seed crop in the Peace Region.

Root systems are fibrous with short rhizomes. Roots form a thick sod that is resilient to traffic, but they are less dense than smooth bromegrass or Kentucky bluegrass.

Stems are up to 90 cm (35 in.) tall and are often reclining at the base. Mostly basal leaves are produced and are 5 to15 cm (2 to 6 in.) long.

Bluejoint Reedgrass

Bluejoint is a robust, hardy, tall, tufted, perennial grass native to boreal forests. It gets its name from the purplish-blue nodes on its stems, and is also referred to as Canada bluejoint grass, reedgrass, marsh reedgrass, and Scribner’s reedgrass. It provides good spring forage for livestock and native ungulates. When harvested as livestock feed from wet meadows that contain significant amounts of bluejoint reedgrass, it is referred to as “beaver grass.”

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